0
DIY YouTuber Builds His Own 256-Core RISC-V Megacluster, Running At 14.7 GHz Single-Core Frequency

DIY YouTuber Builds His Own 256-Core RISC-V Megacluster, Running At 14.7 GHz Single-Core Frequency

Famous DIY Gadget YouTuber, Butlonihe has made his own. RISC-V Mega Cluster, which has a “compact” design and some very interesting features.

Apparently, you can build your own megacluster using RISC-V, just be sure to manage your bus connections properly.

DIY examples are exciting to see, especially those that revolve around the tech industry because they show us the untapped potential of certain products or devices, and in this case, the RISC-V architecture itself. Well, Bataloni's experience here is not easy as it involves dealing with multiple superclusters.

Photo credit: Butloni

His idea was to encapsulate 16 of these superclusters on a single interface, but this later became unmanageable, so he designed his own “cluster blade”, which consisted of two microcontrollers mounted on a board. , each of them managed a supercluster. This. Through the cluster blade, he was able to give each supercluster its own bus interface.

Photo credit: Butloni

Each of the cluster blades housed two CH32V203 microcontrollers, and Bitluni combined eight of them to form one large homogeneous layer. The assembly process involved soldering each microcontroller to the circuit board and then connecting the GPIO pins to begin the testing phase of its design.

Photo credit: Butloni

Despite a rigorous thought process, Butloni encountered a major design flaw. It lost an internal clock source, causing the installed LEDs to display functionality by blinking in random, erratic patterns. After tinkering with the program and debugging the bus synchronization, Bitluni reached the desired functionality with its DIY cluster.

Photo credit: Butloni

The overall building process was quite interesting to watch, and it was a pleasure to see the dedication of Batloni. Despite the lack of purpose behind the DIY project, he certainly seemed determined. Finally, its massive cluster managed to house 256 RISC-V-based microcontrollers and also operates at a single-core frequency of 14.7 GHz.

Share this story.

Facebook

Twitter

About the Author

Leave a Reply